Author Archives: Larry Fedja

Custody campaign groups back a new ‘refreshing’ research project

Police Shieldsource: Dr David Baker
published: 10 February 2017

4WardEver UK and the United Families & Friends Campaign (UFFC) are putting their support behind new research to be conducted by Dr David Baker of Coventry University, examining custody deaths from the viewpoint of the families that are affected.

Here’s what Dr David Baker has to say;

“I’m trying to make contact with you because I am interviewing family members who have had relatives die after police contact. I am documenting a number of things, the key ones are: how this death occurred, how you feel it was represented in the media, how the community reacted to the death, how you tried to get justice for your loved one, and how you feel you were (or were not) supported through this process. Read the rest of this entry

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Remembering Pauline Campbell : 8 Years on and sorely missed

Benjamin Zephaniah & Pauline Campbell

4WardEver UK pays respect to our sister and comrade as we mark the 8th anniversary of her tragic death. “We salute you”

Pauline Campbell was found dead on 15 May 2008, not far from the grave of her daughter Sarah. Sarah died in January 2003 in HMP Styal.

Picture: Pauline Campbell with Benjamin Zephaniah, Cousin of Mikey Powell @ the ‘Moving Forward Together’ event in Birmingham, 2005.

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Vulnerable ‘at risk in mass secure units for juveniles’

Prisoner hands on barssource: The Observer
published: 29 Nov 2014

Controversial plans that would see children “warehoused” in a new generation of large-scale secure colleges for juvenile offenders will be confirmed on Monday [24 November].

Peers in the House of Lords had tabled amendments to the criminal justice and courts bill so that the colleges would exclude boys under the age of 15 and all girls. But the government will reject the amendments when the bill goes back before parliament.

The move will dismay prison reform groups, who are concerned by plans to create large units capable of holding up to 320 offenders, including girls and boys aged between 12 and 17.

The government believes the colleges will provide a more healthy environment for young offenders, one that is more like a school than a prison, and stresses that girls and younger boys will be protected because they will be held in separate, fenced-off blocks. Read the rest of this entry